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Bandage Contact Lenses versus Deproteinized Calf Blood Extract Eye Gel for Recurrent Corneal Erosion Syndrome: A Case-Control Study

Authors Li J, Ma Y, Huang X, Xu L, Tang S

Received 20 August 2020

Accepted for publication 21 October 2020

Published 13 November 2020 Volume 2020:16 Pages 1109—1115

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/TCRM.S277282

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single anonymous peer review

Peer reviewer comments 2

Editor who approved publication: Professor Deyun Wang


Jing Li, Yu Ma, Xiaohan Huang, Lanfang Xu, Shaohua Tang

Department of Ophthalmology, Beijing Jishuitan Hospital, Beijing, People’s Republic of China

Correspondence: Jing Li; Shaohua Tang
Beijing Jishuitan Hospital, 31 Xinjiekou East St., Xicheng District, Beijing 100035, People’s Republic of China
Tel +86-10-58398208
Email lijing_pku@163.com; yanke_jst@163.com

Background: The clinical efficacy of eye drops in the treatment of recurrent corneal erosion syndrome (RCES) is not satisfactory. Many studies have confirmed the positive effect of the bandage contact lens (BCL) in corneal diseases, but not many in patients with RCES. The purpose of this study is to investigate the efficacy of the BCL compared with deproteinized calf blood extract eye gel in the initial treatment of RCES.
Methods: Forty-seven patients with RCES treated in our hospital from September 2010 to September 2018 were retrospectively analyzed, including 24 cases (26 eyes) in the bandage contact lenses (BCLs) group wearing bandage contact lens and 23 cases (24 eyes) in the drug group treated with deproteinized calf blood extract eye gel. The efficacy was evaluated after 3 months of treatment, with a mean follow-up time of 21.15 ± 1.71 months in the BCL group and 20.87 ± 1.89 months in the drug group. Corneal erosion resolution, pain relief, visual acuity recovery time, recurrence and complications were observed.
Results: After 3 months of treatment, 22 eyes (22/26, 84.6%) in the BCLs group achieved complete resolution, compared with 14 eyes (14/24, 58.3%) in the drug group (P < 0.05). The corneal healing time in the BCLs group was 4.77 ± 4.51 weeks, which was significantly shorter than that in the drug group (9.83 ± 5.93 weeks (P < 0.01)). At 1 and 2 months after treatment, the visual analogue score (VAS) in the BCLs group (3.28 ± 1.15 at 1 month and 1.90 ± 0.77 at 2 months) decreased more significantly than that in the drug group (4.54 ± 0.89 at 1 month and 2.43 ± 0.93 at 2months, P =0.000 at 1 month and P=0.034 at 2 months). At 3 months after treatment, the mean BCVA in the BCL group (logMAR 0.03± 0.08) improved more significantly than that in the drug group (logMAR 0.14± 0.12,P=0.001). The complete recovery time of visual acuity was 5.46 ± 4.43 weeks in the BCLs group, compared with 10.33 ± 6.12 weeks in the drug group (P =0.003). During further follow-up, recurrence was observed in 2 eyes (2/22, 9.1%) of the BCLs group and 6 eyes (6/14, 42.8%) of the drug group. No patient in both groups developed adverse side effects.
Conclusion: Bandage contact lenses are safe and effective in the initial treatment of RCES. Compared with topical deproteinized calf blood extract eye gel, the use of BCLs can provide a higher cure rate, better pain control, faster visual recovery and lower recurrence rate.
Trial Registration: Chinese Clinical Trial Registry, ChiCTR2000031241. Registered 25 March 2020- Retrospectively registered, http://www.chictr.org.cn/edit.aspx?pid=51309andhtm=4.

Keywords: bandage contact lens, recurrent corneal erosion syndrome, deproteinized calf blood extract eye gel

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