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Auto-transfusion tourniquets: the next evolution of tourniquets

Authors Tang DH, Olesnicky BT, Eby MW, Heiskell LE

Received 11 October 2012

Accepted for publication 27 August 2013

Published 6 December 2013 Volume 2013:5 Pages 29—32

DOI https://dx.doi.org/10.2147/OAEM.S39042

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 2

David H Tang,1,2,3 Bohdan T Olesnicky,1,3 Michael W Eby,1,4 Lawrence E Heiskell1,5

1International School of Tactical Medicine, Palm Springs, CA, USA; 2Eisenhower Medical Center, Rancho Mirage, CA, USA; 3High Desert Medical Center, Joshua Tree, CA, USA; 4Veterans Administration Loma Linda Healthcare System, Loma Linda, CA, USA; 5Fallbrook Community Hospital, Fallbrook, CA, USA

Abstract: In this article, we discuss the relationship between hemorrhagic shock and the pathophysiology of shock using conventional tourniquets. We will focus on corollary benefits with the use of HemaClear®, a self-contained, sterile, exsanguinating auto-transfusion tourniquet. This discussion will demonstrate that the use of auto-transfusion tourniquets is a practical evidence-based approach in fluid resuscitation: it shortens the duration of shock after hemorrhage and trauma compared with conventional tourniquets. Emphasis is placed on the use of the HemaClear® as an alternative fluid resuscitation tool which is more efficient in the battlefield, pre-hospital and in-hospital settings.

Keywords: auto-transfusion tourniquet, field exsanguination, hemorrhagic shock, tourniquet, perfusion requirement, HemaClear® ATT

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