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Association of serum procalcitonin and C-reactive protein levels with CURB-65 criteria among patients with community-acquired pneumonia

Authors Keramat F, Ghasemi Basir HR, Abdoli E, Shafiee Aghdam A, Poorolajal J

Received 10 February 2018

Accepted for publication 5 April 2018

Published 13 June 2018 Volume 2018:11 Pages 217—223

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/IJGM.S165190

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewers approved by Dr Colin Mak

Peer reviewer comments 2

Editor who approved publication: Dr Scott Fraser


Fariba Keramat,1,2 Hamid Reza Ghasemi Basir,3 Elham Abdoli,2 Arghavan Shafiei Aghdam,4 Jalal Poorolajal5

1Brucellosis Research Center, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan, Iran; 2Department of Infectious Diseases, Sina Hospital, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan, Iran; 3Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan, Iran; 4School of Medicine, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan, Iran; 5Research Center for Health Sciences, Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan, Iran

Background: The concentration of diagnostic markers such as inflammatory biomarkers including procalcitonin (PCT) and C-reactive protein (CRP) increases in bacterial infections. The aim of this study was to compare serum PCT and CRP levels with CURB-65 ranking, in the patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP).
Patients and methods: In a cross-sectional study, 93 hospitalized patients with a definite diagnosis of CAP, considering inclusion and exclusion criteria, were enrolled. Serum PCT and CRP levels and their relations with CURB-65 criteria were assessed.
Results: The mean serum levels of PCT and CRP were 3.64±12.32 ng/mL and 75.01±51.93 mg/L, respectively. There was a statistically significant association between CURB-65 criteria and serum levels of PCT (P=0.0001) and CRP (P=0.007), which means that the concentration of these two inflammatory biomarkers increased with an increase in the score of CURB-65 criteria. Moreover, there was a statistically significant association between the serum level of PCT and the outcomes of the disease (P<0.001).
Conclusion: According to the results, the serum level of PCT or CRP is a strong prognostic factor for evaluating severity of CAP and is a suitable factor for the CURB-65 criteria in the decision making of whether a patient with CAP in the ICU should be admitted.

Keywords: procalcitonin, community-acquired pneumonia, C-reactive protein, CURB-65

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