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Assessment of acceptability and ease of use of gelling fiber dressings in the management of heavily exuding wounds

Authors Naik G, Harding KG

Received 4 November 2018

Accepted for publication 6 April 2019

Published 29 May 2019 Volume 2019:6 Pages 19—26

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/CWCMR.S162687

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewers approved by Dr Colin Mak

Peer reviewer comments 2

Editor who approved publication: Professor Marco Romanelli


Gurudutt Naik, Keith G Harding

Department of Wound Healing, Welsh Wound Innovation Centre, Rhondda Cynon Taf, Wales, CF72 8UX, UK

Abstract: Optimal exudate management plays an important role in wound healing. Choosing the right methods for this purpose is the key in achieving successful outcomes in the management of chronic wounds. Gelling fiber dressings are a class of dressing that forms a gel when they come into contact with wound exudate. This property allows them to effectively lock in excess fluid and at the same time provides enough moisture for healing to progress. Alginate and chitosan are naturally occurring gelling agents used in dressings, whereas carboxymethyl-cellulose, also called carmellose, is synthetically produced. This article reviews the use of these gelling fiber dressings in chronic wounds with a particular focus on their ability to manage wound exudate effectively.

Keywords: wound healing, wound management, chronic wounds, hydrofiber, hydrocolloid fiber, wound fluid

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