Back to Browse Journals » Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment » Volume 3 » Issue 2

The treatment of generalized anxiety disorder with pregabalin, an atypical anxiolytic

Authors Jeffrey R Strawn, Thomas D Geracioti Jr

Published 15 May 2007 Volume 2007:3(2) Pages 237—243

Jeffrey R Strawn1,2,3, Thomas D Geracioti Jr1,2,3

1Department of Psychiatry, University of Cincinnati, College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH, USA; 2Research and 3Psychiatry Services, Cincinnati Veterans Affairs Medical Center Cincinnati, OH, USA

Abstract: A constellation of pharmacologic treatments for generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) have been developed over the past five decades, although each has a number of potential drawbacks in clinical practice. This review addresses one potentially new pharmacologic treatment for generalized anxiety disorder, the gamma-aminobutyric acid analogue pregabalin. We review the mechanism of action, and pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of pregabalin as well as the results of 5 double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of pregabalin in the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). Based entirely on data from these industry-sponsored (Pfizer), multi-site clinical trials in patients with GAD, pregabalin appears to be generally well tolerated and has rapid onset of action (approximately 1 week), comparable efficacy to benzodiazepines and lower discontinuation rates compared with other pharmacologic treatments. Thus in GAD, a disorder that is often suboptimally responsive to traditional psychotherapeutic and psychopharmacologic interventions – secondary to poor efficacy, tolerability, and/or side-effects – pregabalin may have a primary role in GAD patients, especially in those with certain psychiatric comorbidities or individuals who are on multi-drug regimens for medical comorbidities.

Keywords: GAD, pregabalin, panic attack, anxiety disorders, antidepressant, anxiolytic

Download Article [PDF] 

Readers of this article also read:

PEGylated apoptotic protein-loaded PLGA microspheres for cancer therapy

Byeon HJ, Kim I, Choi JS, Lee ES, Shin BS, Youn YS

International Journal of Nanomedicine 2015, 10:739-748

Published Date: 19 January 2015

Manganese-containing Prussian blue nanoparticles for imaging of pediatric brain tumors

Dumont MF, Yadavilli S, Sze RW, Nazarian J, Fernandes R

International Journal of Nanomedicine 2014, 9:2581-2595

Published Date: 23 May 2014

Self-assembled micelles of novel amphiphilic copolymer cholesterol-coupled F68 containing cabazitaxel as a drug delivery system

Song Y, Tian Q, Huang Z, Fan D, She Z, Liu X, Cheng X, Yu B, Deng Y

International Journal of Nanomedicine 2014, 9:2307-2317

Published Date: 12 May 2014

Nanostructured lipid carrier-loaded hyaluronic acid microneedles for controlled dermal delivery of a lipophilic molecule

Lee SG, Jeong JH, Lee KM, Jeong KH, Yang H, Kim M, Jung H, Lee S, Choi YW

International Journal of Nanomedicine 2014, 9:289-299

Published Date: 31 December 2013

Nanoparticles of carbon allotropes inhibit glioblastoma multiforme angiogenesis in ovo

Grodzik M, Sawosz E, Wierzbicki M, Orlowski P, Hotowy A, Niemiec T, Szmidt M, Mitura K, Chwalibog A

International Journal of Nanomedicine 2011, 6:3041-3048

Published Date: 25 November 2011

Doxorubicin-incorporated polymeric micelles composed of dextran-b-poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) copolymer

Jeong YI, Kim DH, Chung CW, Yoo JJ, Choi KH, Kim CH, Ha SH, Kang DH

International Journal of Nanomedicine 2011, 6:1415-1427

Published Date: 6 July 2011

Long-term disease-free survivor of metastatic large-cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the lung treated with amrubicin and irinotecan

Shinichiro Ryuge, Shi-Xu Jiang, Mayuko Wada, Ken Katono, et al.

Drug Design, Development and Therapy 2009, 3:213-217

Published Date: 13 July 2009