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Optimal management of nausea and vomiting of pregnancy

Authors Neda Ebrahimi, Caroline Maltepe, Adrienne Einarson

Published 4 August 2010 Volume 2010:2 Pages 241—248


Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 3

Neda Ebrahimi1,2, Caroline Maltepe2, Adrienne Einarson2

1Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; 2Motherisk Program, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Abstract: Nausea and vomiting of pregnancy (NVP) is a common medical condition in pregnancy with significant physical and psychological morbidity. Up to 90% of women will suffer from NVP symptoms in the first trimester of pregnancy with up to 2% developing hyperemesis gravidarum which is NVP at its worst, leading to hospitalization and even death in extreme cases. Optimal management of NVP begins with nonpharmacological approaches, use of ginger, acupressure, vitamin B6, and dietary adjustments. The positive impact of these noninvasive, inexpensive and safe methods has been demonstrated. Pharmacological treatments are available with varying effectiveness; however, the only drug marketed specifically for the treatment of NVP in pregnancy is Diclectin® (vitamin B6 and doxylamine). In addition, the Motherisk algorithm provides a guideline for use of safe and effective drugs for the treatment of NVP. Optimal medical management of symptoms will ensure the mental and physical wellbeing of expecting mothers and their developing babies during this often stressful and difficult time period. Dismissing NVP as an inconsequential part of pregnancy can have serious ramifications for both mother and baby.

Keywords: pharmacological/nonpharmacological treatments, NVP

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