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The rate of symptomatic improvement of congenital nasolacrimal duct obstruction in Japanese infants treated with conservative management during the 1st year of age

Authors Kakizaki H, Takahashi Y, Kinoshita S, Shiraki K, Iwaki M

Published 6 June 2008 Volume 2008:2(2) Pages 291—294

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/OPTH.S2582


Hirohiko Kakizaki1, Yasuhiro Takahashi2, Shinsuke Kinoshita1, Kunihiko Shiraki2, Masayoshi Iwaki1

1Department of Ophthalmology, Aichi Medical University, Aichi, Japan; 2Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka, Japan

Abstract: This study aimed to examine the rate of symptomatic improvement of congenital nasolacrimal duct obstruction (CNLDO) in Japanese infants treated with conservative management within the 1st year of age. Thirty-five lacrimal ducts in 27 patients diagnosed with CNLDO were included in the study. During the observational period, lacrimal ducts were massaged. As well, antibiotic eye drops, to be administered 4 times a day, were sometimes prescribed for obvious conjunctivitis. Two lacrimal ducts in 2 patients were probed before the 1st year of age because of dacryocystitis or severe blepharitis; these patients were included in the unimproved group. Twenty-nine lacrimal ducts in 21 patients resolved during the period (82.9%); with 16 lacrimal ducts resolving before six months of age. Therefore, a comparatively high percentage of resolution for CNLDO (82.9%) following conservative management was shown before the 1st year of age in Japanese infants.

Keywords: congenital nasolacrimal duct obstruction, symptomatic improvement, conservative management, massage, probing

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