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An evidence-based review of the potential role of icatibant in the treatment of acute attacks in hereditary angioedema type I and II

Authors Floccard B, Hautin, Bouillet L, Coppere, Allaouchiche

Received 24 April 2012

Accepted for publication 21 June 2012

Published 27 September 2012 Volume 2012:7 Pages 105—114

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/CE.S24743

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 3


Bernard Floccard,1 Etienne Hautin,1 Laurence Bouillet,2 Brigitte Coppere,3 Bernard Allaouchiche1

1Département d'Anesthésie Réanimation, Centre de Référence des Angiœdèmes à Bradykinine, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Hôpital Edouard Herriot, Lyon, 2Clinique Universitaire de Médecine Interne, Centre National de Référence des Angiœdèmes à Bradykinine, CHU de Grenoble, Grenoble, 3Service de Médecine Interne, Centre de Référence des Angiœdèmes à Bradykinine, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Hôpital Edouard Herriot, Lyon, France

Introduction: Icatibant, a first-in-class B2 bradykinin receptor antagonist, appears to have a favorable efficacy and safety profile for the treatment of acute attacks of hereditary angioedema in adults.
Aims: To update the evidence and provide an overview of the available data on icatibant.
Evidence review: Peer reviewed articles published and listed in Medline Search and published updated guidelines for the treatment of acute attacks in hereditary angioedema type I and II in adults were reviewed. The validity and quality of evidence were evaluated.
Place in therapy: Clinical evidence for the treatment of acute hereditary angioedema attacks with icatibant is strong. Approximately 10% of the patients require a second dose. No serious adverse reactions have been reported. The only significant side effects consistently registered by 90% of patients are transient local pain, swelling, and erythema at the local injection site.
Conclusion: Subcutaneously administered 30 mg icatibant has been shown to be a safe and efficacious treatment in clinical trials. It is the only specific treatment authorized for self-administration by the subcutaneous route offering increased patient independence.

Keywords: icatibant, hereditary angioedema, self-administration, acute attacks

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