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A Unique Case Of Tenofovir-Induced DRESS Syndrome Associated With Raynaud’s Of The Tongue

Authors Aqtash O, Ajmeri AN, Thornhill BA, Anderson E, Carroll R, Elhamdani A, Tackett E

Received 18 May 2019

Accepted for publication 17 September 2019

Published 23 October 2019 Volume 2019:12 Pages 381—385

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/IJGM.S215511

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewers approved by Dr Nicola Ludin

Peer reviewer comments 2

Editor who approved publication: Dr Scott Fraser


Obadah Aqtash,1 Aman Naim Ajmeri,1 Brent A Thornhill,1 Elise Anderson,2 Ryan Carroll,1 Adee Elhamdani,1 Eva Tackett1

1Internal Medicine, Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, Marshall University, Huntington, WV 25701, USA; 2Charleston Area Medical Center, Charelston, WV 25701, USA

Correspondence: Aman Naim Ajmeri
Internal Medicine, Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, Marshall University, Huntington, WV 25701, USA, 
Email ajmeri@marshall.edu

Abstract: Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) is a potentially fatal severe adverse reaction to medications. Numerous drugs have been implicated, with carbamazepine and allopurinol being the most common. Tenofovir-induced DRESS is extremely rare. We report a case of a 65-year-old male patient with a diffuse exfoliative maculopapular rash across his entire body of five weeks of duration. The patient also had icteric sclera, abnormal liver enzymes and Raynaud’s of the tongue, nose and the left fifth finger. After discontinuation of tenofovir, the case resolved over a span of ten days. A high index of suspicion is crucial along with the prompt withdrawal of the offending medication for a good outcome.

Keywords: DRESS, drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms, tenofovir, tenofovir-induced DRESS, Raynaud’s phenomena, Raynaud’s of the tongue

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