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A retrospective study of nine cases of Acanthamoeba keratitis

Authors Muto T, Isao Ishikawa, Matsumoto Y, Chikuda M

Published 12 October 2010 Volume 2010:4 Pages 1189—1192

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/OPTH.S14202

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 4

Tetsuya Mutoh, Isao Ishikawa, Yukihiro Matsumoto, Makoto Chikuda
Dokkyo Medical University Koshigaya Hospital, Saitama, Japan

Purpose: To evaluate the clinical features of Acanthamoeba keratitis in nine patients diagnosed at Dokkyo Medical University Koshigaya Hospital, Saitama, Japan.
Methods: In nine eyes of nine patients, Acanthamoeba keratitis was diagnosed by direct light microscopy of corneal scrapings stained by the Parker ink-potassium hydroxide method between September 2006 and September 2009. Their clinical features and course were studied retrospectively. Antifungal eye drops, systemic antifungal therapy, and surgical debridement of the corneal lesions were performed in all patients.
Results: At presentation, the clinical stage was initial in six cases, transient in one case, and complete in two cases. The patients were all contact lens wearers who had washed their lens storage cases with tap water. After treatment, final visual acuity was improved in six cases, unchanged in one case, and worse in two cases. The patient with the worst final vision (hand motion) had rheumatoid arthritis and was taking oral prednisolone, which led to corneal perforation and prevented adequate debridement from being done.
Conclusion: Acanthamoeba keratitis is closely related to wearing contact lenses and washing the lens storage case with tap water. Although final visual acuity improved after treatment in most patients, insufficient surgical debridement resulted in a poor visual prognosis.

Keywords: surgical debridement, Acanthamoeba keratitis, contact lens wearers

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