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A decomposable silica-based antibacterial coating for percutaneous titanium implant

Authors Wang J, Wu G, Liu X, Sun G, Li D, Wei H

Received 1 October 2016

Accepted for publication 1 December 2016

Published 6 January 2017 Volume 2017:12 Pages 371—379

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/IJN.S123622

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewers approved by Dr Lakshmi Kiran Chelluri

Peer reviewer comments 2

Editor who approved publication: Dr Lei Yang


Jia Wang,1,* Guofeng Wu,2,* Xiangwei Liu,3,* Guanyang Sun,1 Dehua Li,3 Hongbo Wei3

1State Key Laboratory of Military Stomatology, National Clinical Research Center for Oral Diseases & Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Stomatology, Department of Prosthodontics, School of Stomatology, The Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an, 2Department of Prosthodontics, Nanjing Stomatological Hospital, Medical School of Nanjing University, Nanjing, 3State Key Laboratory of Military Stomatology, National Clinical Research Center for Oral Diseases & Shaanxi Engineering Research Center for Dental Materials and Advanced Manufacture, Department of Oral Implants, School of Stomatology, The Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an, People’s Republic of China

*These authors contributed equally to this work

Abstract: Although percutaneous titanium implants have become one of the best choices as retainers in the facial defects, peri-implantitis still occurs at a significant rate. This unwanted complication occurs due to adhesion of bacteria and subsequent biofilm formation. To solve this problem, we have developed a novel antibiotic nanodelivery system based on self-decomposable silica nanoparticles. In this study, silica-gentamycin (SG) nanoparticles were successfully fabricated using an innovative one-pot solution. The nanoparticles were incorporated within a gelatin matrix and cross-linked on microarc-oxidized titanium. To characterize the SG nanoparticles, their particle size, zeta potential, surface morphology, in vitro drug release, and decomposition process were sequentially evaluated. The antibacterial properties against the gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus, including bacterial viability, antibacterial rate, and bacteria morphology, were analyzed using SG-loaded titanium specimens. Any possible influence of released gentamycin on the viability of human fibroblasts, which are the main component of soft tissues, was investigated. SG nanoparticles from the antibacterial titanium coating continuously released gentamycin and inhibited S. aureus growth. In vitro investigation showed that the obtained nanodelivery system has good biocompatibility. Therefore, this design can be further investigated as a method to prevent infection around percutaneous implants.

Keywords: silica nanoparticles, microarc oxidation, gentamycin, control release, fibroblasts

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