skip to content
Dovepress - Open Access to Scientific and Medical Research
View our mobile site

15356

It is not always about gains: utilities and disutilities associated with treatment features in patients with moderate-to-severe psoriasis



Original Research

(3116) Total Article Views


Authors: Umar N, Schöllgen I, Terris DD

Published Date March 2012 Volume 2012:6 Pages 187 - 194
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/PPA.S29285

Nasir Umar1, Ina Schöllgen1, Darcey D Terris1,2

1Mannheim Institute of Public Health, Social and Preventive Medicine, Universitätsmedizin Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim, Germany; 2Department of Health Policy and Management, College of Public Health, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, USA

Background: Patient-centered care has been proposed as a strategy for improving treatment outcomes in the management of psoriasis and other chronic diseases. A more detailed understanding of patients’ utilities and disutilities associated with treatment features may facilitate shared decision-making in the clinical encounter. The purpose of this study was to examine the features of psoriasis treatment that are most and least preferred by patients and to identify correlates of these preferences.
Methods: A cross-sectional survey of 163 patients with moderate-to-severe psoriasis was conducted in a German academic medical center. We assessed patients’ characteristics, elicited their preferences for a range of potential treatment features, and quantified preference scores (utilities) associated with each treatment feature using hierarchical Bayes estimation. After identifying the most and least preferred treatment features, we explored correlates of these preferences using multivariate regression models.
Results: Mean preference scores (MPS) for the least preferred treatment features were consistently greater than those for the most preferred treatment features. Patients generally expressed strong preferences against prolonged treatments in the inpatient setting (MPS = –13.48) and those with a lower probability of benefit (MPS = –12.28), while treatments with a high probability of benefit (MPS = 10.51) were generally preferred. Younger patients and women were more concerned with treatment benefit as compared with older patients and men.
Conclusion: Both negative and positive preferences appear important for shared decision-making. Recognition of characteristics associated with strong negative preferences may be particularly useful in promoting patient-centered environments.

Keywords: conjoint analysis, patient preferences, treatment preferences, psoriasis



Post to:
Cannotea Citeulike Del.icio.us Facebook LinkedIn Twitter


Readers of this article also read: