Back to Browse Journals » International Journal of Nanomedicine » Volume 9 » Supplement 1

Effect of self-assembled peptide–mesenchymal stem cell complex on the progression of osteoarthritis in a rat model

Authors Kim JE, Lee SM, Kim SH, Tatman P, Gee AO, Kim DH, Lee KE, Jung Y, Kim SJ

Published Date May 2014 Volume 2014:9(Supplement 1) Pages 141—157

DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/IJN.S54114

Received 6 September 2013, Accepted 10 October 2013, Published 7 May 2014

Ji Eun Kim,1 Sang Mok Lee,2 Soo Hyun Kim,1 Phil Tatman,3 Albert O Gee,4 Deok-Ho Kim,3,5 Kyung Eun Lee,6 Youngmee Jung,1 Sang Jun Kim2

1Biomaterials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul, South Korea; 2Department of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul, South Korea; 3Department of Bioengineering, 4Department of Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine, 5Institute for Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine and Center for Cardiovascular Biology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA; 6Advanced Analysis Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul, South Korea

Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) encapsulated in self-assembled peptide (SAP) hydrogels in a rat knee model for the prevention of osteoarthritis (OA) progression.
Materials and methods: Nanostructured KLD-12 SAPs were used as the injectable hydrogels. Thirty-three Sprague Dawley rats were used for the OA model. Ten rats were used for the evaluation of biotin-tagged SAP disappearance. Twenty-three rats were divided into four groups: MSC (n=6), SAP (n=6), SAP-MSC (n=6), and no treatment (n=5). MSCs, SAPs, and SAP-MSCs were injected into the knee joints 3 weeks postsurgery. Histologic examination, immunofluorescent staining, measurement of cytokine levels, and micro-computed tomography analysis were conducted 6 weeks after injections. Behavioral studies were done to establish baseline measurements before treatment, and repeated 3 and 6 weeks after treatment to measure the efficacy of SAP-MSCs.
Results: Concentration of biotinylated SAP at week 1 was not significantly different from those at week 3 and week 6 (P=0.565). Bone mineral density was significantly lower in SAP-MSC groups than controls (P=0.002). Significant differences in terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase deoxyuridine triphosphate nick-end labeling staining between the control group and all other groups were observed. Caspase-8, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 1, and matrix metalloproteinase 9 were diffusely stained in controls, whereas localized or minimal staining was observed in other groups. Modified Mankin scores were significantly lower in the SAP and SAP-MSC groups than in controls (P=0.001 and 0.013). Although not statistically significant, synovial inflammation scores were lower in the SAP (1.3±0.3) and SAP-MSC (1.3±0.2) groups than in controls (2.6±0.2). However, neither the cytokine level nor the behavioral score was significantly different between groups.
Conclusion: Injection of SAP-MSC hydrogels showed evidence of chondroprotection, as measured by the histologic grading and decreased expression of biochemical markers of inflammation and apoptosis. It also lowered subchondral bone mineral density, which can be increased by OA. This suggests that the SAP-MSC complex may have clinical potential to inhibit OA progression.

Keywords: self-assembled peptide, mesenchymal stem cell, osteoarthritis, apoptosis, chondrogenesis

Download Article [PDF] View Full Text [HTML] 

Creative Commons License This work is published by Dove Medical Press Limited, and licensed under Creative Commons Attribution - Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License. The full terms of the License are available at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed. Permissions beyond the scope of the License are administered by Dove Medical Press Limited. Information on how to request permission may be found at: http://www.dovepress.com/permissions.php

Readers of this article also read:

Factors associated with group bullying and psychopathology in elementary school students using child-welfare facilities

Kim JW, Lee K, Lee YS, Han DH, Min KJ, Song SH, Park GN, Lee JY, Kim JO

Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment 2015, 11:991-998

Published Date: 7 April 2015

Study of antitumor activity in breast cell lines using silver nanoparticles produced by yeast

Ortega FG, Fernández-Baldo MA, Fernández JG, Serrano MJ, Sanz MI, Diaz-Mochón JJ, Lorente JA, Raba J

International Journal of Nanomedicine 2015, 10:2021-2031

Published Date: 16 March 2015

Fluorescent magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for cardiac precursor cell selection from stromal vascular fraction and optimization for magnetic resonance imaging

Verma VK, Kamaraju SR, Kancherla R, Kona LK, Beevi SS, Debnath T, Usha SP, Vadapalli R, Arbab AS, Chelluri LK

International Journal of Nanomedicine 2015, 10:711-726

Published Date: 20 January 2015

Codelivery of doxorubicin and curcumin with lipid nanoparticles results in improved efficacy of chemotherapy in liver cancer

Zhao XJ, Chen Q, Liu W, Li YS, Tang HB, Liu XH, Yang XL

International Journal of Nanomedicine 2015, 10:257-270

Published Date: 30 December 2014

Fabrication and characterization of anisotropic nanofiber scaffolds for advanced drug delivery systems

Jalani G, Jung CW, Lee JS, Lim DW

International Journal of Nanomedicine 2014, 9:33-49

Published Date: 6 May 2014

Endocytosis and exocytosis of nanoparticles in mammalian cells

Oh N, Park JH

International Journal of Nanomedicine 2014, 9:51-63

Published Date: 6 May 2014