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Implications of public-health insecticide resistance and replacement costs for malaria control: challenges and policy options for endemic countries and donors

Authors Miller MW, Tren R

Published Date April 2012 Volume 2012:3 Pages 1—19

DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/RRTM.S30914

Received 16 February 2012, Accepted 24 February 2012, Published 24 April 2012

Michael W Miller1, Richard Tren2
1Duke Global Health Institute, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA; 2Africa Fighting Malaria, Washington, DC, USA

Abstract: Millions of people rely on public-health insecticides for malaria prevention. Yet growing insecticide resistance may threaten malaria control programs through decreasing effectiveness and possibly unsustainable cost-increases. Insufficient investment by stakeholders in the search for new public-health insecticides in recent decades has left malaria control programs with limited alternatives with which to manage resistance and maintain program effectiveness. While alternative insecticides are available, short of an unforeseen, significant increase in funding, their higher cost would compel programs to reduce malaria control coverage, leading to increased mortality and morbidity. In order to limit these negative effects on cost and coverage, we propose that policymakers and malaria stakeholders consider adoption of existing policies from successful efforts to secure reduced prices and increased access to other essential health interventions.

Keywords: vector control, indoor residual spraying (IRS), malaria control policy, research and development (R+D), priority review voucher (PRV), compulsory license

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