Back to Browse Journals » Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management » Volume 6

Update on current and emerging treatment options for post-polio syndrome

Authors Elisabeth Farbu

Published Date July 2010 Volume 2010:6 Pages 307—313

DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/TCRM.S4440

Published 7 July 2010

Elisabeth Farbu
Neurocenter and National Competence Center for Movement Disorders, Stavanger University Hospital, Stavanger, Norway

Abstract: Post-polio syndrome (PPS) refers to the clinical deterioration experienced by many polio survivors several decades after their acute illness. The symptoms are new muscle weakness, decreased muscle endurance, fatigue, muscle pain, joint pain, cold intolerance, and this typical clinical entity is reported from different parts of the world. The pathophysiology behind PPS is not fully understood, but a combination of distal degeneration of enlarged motor units caused by increased metabolic demands and the normal aging process, in addition to inflammatory mechanisms, are thought to be involved. There is no diagnostic test for PPS, and the diagnosis is based on a proper clinical workup where all other possible explanations for the new symptoms are ruled out. The basic principle of management of PPS lies in physical activity, individually tailored training programs, and lifestyle modification. Muscle weakness and muscle pain may be helped with specific training programs, in which training in warm water seems to be particularly helpful. Properly fitted orthoses can improve the biomechanical movement pattern and be energy-saving. Fatigue can be relieved with lifestyle changes, assistive devices, and training programs. Respiratory insufficiency can be controlled with noninvasive respiratory aids including biphasic positive pressure ventilators. Pharmacologic agents like prednisone, amantadine, pyridostigmine, and coenzyme Q10 are of no benefit in PPS. Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) has been tried in three studies, all having positive results. IVIG could probably be a therapeutic alternative, but the potential benefit is modest, and some important questions are still unanswered, in particular to which patients this treatment is useful, the dose, and the therapeutic interval.

Keywords: polio, survivors, fatigue, aging, therapeutics

Download Article [PDF] 

Creative Commons License This work is published by Dove Medical Press Limited, and licensed under Creative Commons Attribution - Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License. The full terms of the License are available at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed. Permissions beyond the scope of the License are administered by Dove Medical Press Limited. Information on how to request permission may be found at: http://www.dovepress.com/permissions.php

Readers of this article also read:

Evaluation of a prototype electronic personal health record for patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura

Chiche L, Brescianini A, Mancini J, Servy H, Durand JM

Patient Preference and Adherence 2012, 6:725-734

Published Date: 10 October 2012

Fungus-mediated biological synthesis of gold nanoparticles: potential in detection of liver cancer

Chauhan A, Zubair S, Tufail S, Sherwani A, Sajid M, Raman SC, Azam A, Owais M

International Journal of Nanomedicine 2011, 6:2305-2319

Published Date: 12 October 2011

Comparison of two treatments for coxarthrosis: local hyperthermia versus radio electric asymmetrical brain stimulation

Castagna A, Rinaldi S, Fontani V, Mannu P, Lotti Margotti M

Clinical Interventions in Aging 2011, 6:201-206

Published Date: 25 July 2011

Adult patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension due to congenital heart disease: a review on advanced medical treatment with bosentan

Mark J Schuuring, Jeroen C Vis, Marielle G Duffels, et al.

Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management 2010, 6:359-366

Published Date: 31 August 2010

Treatment of hemophilia: a review of current advances and ongoing issues

Antonio Coppola, Mirko Di Capua, Matteo Nicola Dario, et al.

Journal of Blood Medicine 2010, 1:183-195

Published Date: 30 August 2010

Long-term treatment with bisphosphonates and their safety in postmenopausal osteoporosis

Michael Pazianas, Cyrus Cooper, F Hal Ebetino, et al

Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management 2010, 6:325-343

Published Date: 19 July 2010

Maximum opening of the mouth by mouth prop during dental procedures increases the risk of upper airway constriction

Hiroshi Ito, Hiroyoshi Kawaai, Shinya Yamazaki, et al

Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management 2010, 6:239-248

Published Date: 12 May 2010

Role of aliskiren in cardio-renal protection and use in hypertensives with multiple risk factors

Eduardo Pimenta, Suzanne Oparil

Vascular Health and Risk Management 2009, 5:453-463

Published Date: 19 May 2009