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Atomoxetine for the treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in children and adolescents: a review

Authors Paul Hammerness, Katherine McCarthy, Elizabeth Mancuso, Cassandra Gendron, Daniel Geller

Published Date March 2009 Volume 2009:5 Pages 215—226

DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/NDT.S3896

Published 25 March 2009

Paul Hammerness, Katherine McCarthy, Elizabeth Mancuso, Cassandra Gendron, Daniel Geller

Clinical and Research Program in Pediatric Psychopharmacology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Cambridge, MA, USA

Objective: This review examines and summarizes the pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties, short- and longer-term efficacy, the moderating effect of comorbid disorders, as well as short- and long-term safety and tolerability of atomoxetine for the treatment of pediatric attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

Methods: A systematic literature search was performed to review the extant literature on articles pertaining to the pharmacological treatment with atomoxetine in pediatric and/or adolescent ADHD.

Results: There is an extensive literature on atomoxetine; over 4000 children have participated in clinical trials of atomoxetine, demonstrating its short- and longer-term efficacy. In addition, studies have examined the moderating effect of comorbid disorders on atomoxetine response, as well as atomoxetine’s therapeutic potential for other psychiatric conditions. Short- and longer-term safety and tolerability continue to be reported.

Conclusions: Atomoxetine is indicated for both acute and maintenance/extended treatment of pediatric ADHD. Clinicians and families must be familiar with atomoxetine’s evidence base, including its profile of clinical response and its possible effectiveness in the presence of comorbidity.

Keywords: ADHD, atomoxetine, pediatric

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